Blog RSS https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/ en New Employer Solutions Ebook Aimed at 2021 Health Plan Decision-making https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/new-employer-solutions-ebook-aimed-2021-health-plan-decision-making <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">New Employer Solutions Ebook Aimed at 2021 Health Plan Decision-making</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/15/2020 - 07:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/129" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to New Employer Solutions Ebook Aimed at 2021 Health Plan Decision-making"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p style="text-align:start">Vanderbilt Health Employer Solutions announces a new Ebook, <a href="https://select.vanderbilthealth.com/employer_ebook.html">“How the Pandemic is Shaping Health Plan Strategies for 2021.” </a>The Ebook is targeted to employers making decisions about their 2021 health plans, and it offers multiple best practices to help them take back control of healthcare costs in the year ahead. It’s a timely communication, as the pandemic has added pressure to cut costs, strained employees’ physical and mental health, and disrupted the physical workplace.</p> <p>The Ebook details four all-too-common challenges for employers large and small:</p> <ul> <li>Rising Healthcare Costs</li> <li>Mounting Healthcare Issues—Both Physical and Mental</li> <li>A Decreased Focus on Preventive Health</li> <li>The Uncertain Needs of a Dispersed, Virtual Workforce</li> </ul> <p>Conquering these challenges can seem overwhelming, but employers can proactivity manage costs and improve employees’ quality of care with careful attention to four best practices—and a helping hand from a diverse array of Vanderbilt Health solutions:</p> <ul> <li>Adopt Innovative Ways to Lower Costs</li> <li>Invest in Behavioral Health</li> <li>Refocus on Preventive Health &amp; Well-being</li> <li>Create a Culture of Health for Your Workplace—Wherever It May Be</li> </ul> <p><strong><a href="https://select.vanderbilthealth.com/employer_ebook.html">Download the Ebook </a>now for thought leadership and resources to help take back control of health plan decision-making—and strengthen your community’s health today and in the post-pandemic workplace.</strong></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/ebookcover.jpg?itok=yH_aQk6x" width="576" height="445" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-caption field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field__item">Vanderbilt Health Employer Solutions&#039; new Ebook is targeted to helping employers make decisions about their 2021 health plans.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Tue, 15 Sep 2020 12:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 129 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com Celebrating Progress, Continuing Prevention: A Q&A With VUMC Infectious Disease Expert Dr. David Aronoff https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/celebrating-progress-continuing-prevention-qa-vumc-infectious-disease-expert <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Celebrating Progress, Continuing Prevention: A Q&amp;A With VUMC Infectious Disease Expert Dr. David Aronoff </span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 09/15/2020 - 06:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/128" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Celebrating Progress, Continuing Prevention: A Q&amp;A With VUMC Infectious Disease Expert Dr. David Aronoff "> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><em><strong>What do we know now about COVID-19 that we didn’t know back in the spring?</strong></em></p> <p>That was the question the Employer Solutions team posed to David Aronoff, MD, Addison B. Scoville Chair in Medicine and Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). The Employer Insights blog last checked in with Dr. Aronoff in May as he answered questions to help business get <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/turning-lights-back-dimmer-switch-recap-back-work-safety-employers-webinar">back to work safely</a>. Since that conversation, he has been busy advising <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/ryman-hospitality-partners-and-vumc-tune-safe-and-healthy-restart-business">Ryman Hospitality Properties</a>, <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/american-airlines-boosts-travelers-peace-mind-vumc-expertise">American Airlines</a> and Nashville employers with the <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/good-go-program-kicks-assist-vanderbilt-health-infectious-disease-expert">Good to Go program</a> on disease prevention, along with his colleague Dr. Thomas Talbot, VUMC Chief Hospital Epidemiologist. Dr. Aronoff regularly educates the Middle Tennessee community on ways to protect themselves from the virus in their lives and at their workplaces.</p> <p>While he does have reassuring news about VUMC's work and worldwide progress toward COVID-19 treatments and potential vaccines, Dr. Aronoff underscored the need to keep up our guard against the virus and stay the course with proven prevention methods. Here are the highlights from our conversation:</p> <p><strong>Now we know, unequivocally, that masks help reduce the spread of the virus. What other messages relating to prevention do you wish everyone would take to heart?</strong></p> <p>After the pandemic peaked here sometime in late July, numbers recently have been improving in Nashville and across the state. By participating in simple, fundamental practices of prevention that by now we know work well, we’ve decreased our number of cases and people hospitalized. Wearing masks in public, maintaining our distance from others, not going out quite as much, paying close attention to hand hygiene and surface disinfection—these are all still important practices to stopping the spread. There are data now to show that that maintaining distance and wearing face coverings has slowed viral spread all over the world.</p> <p>Even though case activity is slowing down in Tennessee, that’s not because most people in Tennessee have already been infected. In fact, the vast majority of Tennesseans have not been infected. If we look at confirmed cases of COVID-19 in our city, county or state, it's still less than 5% of the populations of those regions. The reason that things are improving is because of fundamental participation in acts that slow the spread of this virus.</p> <p>People can get fatigued from wearing masks or feeling like they're trapped inside, and it can be frustrating when we just want to give somebody a hug. But we're not out from underneath this pandemic yet. It's still active and there are still a lot of vulnerable populations to consider.</p> <p><strong>Have we found better and more effective ways to treat those critically ill COVID patients that we didn't have at the beginning of the outbreak?</strong></p> <p>Treatment has been a quickly moving target. It's so easy for us to forget that this disease didn't exist until essentially the end of 2019. There are literally hundreds of clinical trials for vaccines going on, and we have seen randomized controlled trials already completed that have told us vital information about potential therapies that have changed our practice.</p> <p>One good example is an antiviral drug remdesivir, an intravenous medication that has been mostly deployed for hospitalized patients. It has been repurposed for use in COVID-19 in large part because of the <a href="https://news.vumc.org/2020/04/06/vumc-team-aids-development-of-potential-antiviral-drug-for-covid-19/">pioneering work</a> of Mark Denison, MD, VUMC Director of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, and other pediatric infectious disease experts at VUMC. Dr. Denison has been studying coronaviruses for over 30 years, and it was his idea to go to the manufacturer of remdesivir years ago and suggest that it might have some coronavirus activity. That drug has been in clinical trials for COVID-19 and has been shown to accelerate recovery.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.wsmv.com/news/steroid-helps-curb-death-rate-of-severely-ill-covid-19-patients/article_0412fb3c-b0ec-11ea-bae4-7fe51e36ea59.html">other great advance</a> has been the use of an inexpensive medication called dexamethasone and some of its cousins in the corticosteroid family. These anti-inflammatory drugs have been around for a long time and can reduce the exuberance of an immune response to an infection. One of the ways that people get really sick with COVID-19 is because their own immune response flares, particularly in the lungs. We have learned from randomized control trials that dexamethasone actually improves survival for patients who require oxygen and are hospitalized with COVID-19.</p> <p>Here at VUMC, we are using both remdesivir and anti-inflammatory corticosteroids like dexamethasone. We're anticipating that new options are going to come online soon. It’s been rewarding to see that the scientific method works and can be used in a way that saves lives.</p> <p><strong>Why is it essential to test treatments in a structured, controlled way to determine if they’re beneficial?</strong></p> <p>With COVID-19, most people who are diagnosed with this disease do relatively well. Most patients recover without requiring hospitalization, and the vast majority do not die of the virus. For example, in Tennessee, for every 100 people who get diagnosed with COVID-19, 95 of them will recover. Some will recover with disabilities, but they will recover. However, that can make it challenging for us to understand how to improve outcomes.</p> <p>A healthcare professional might want to try out a vitamin, nutritional supplement or certain medicine on their COVID-19 patients. And if they treated 100 of their patients with COVID-19 with that medication or intervention, they would see about 95 of those patients avoid hospitalization and death. That might appear promising, but what's not clear is whether those actions are better than not doing them. In other words, we don’t know whether it's acceptable to accept any kind of risk of a potential therapy without knowing that there's a potential benefit.</p> <p>The beauty of placebo-controlled randomized trials is that we can test to see whether these ideas are truly effective. To do that requires enrolling a lot of patients in large studies in numerous hospitals across the United States and world. These studies must follow strict protocols, provide informed consent to participants and let them know that they may receive an active drug or a placebo. Through this learning process, we've seen how drugs like remdesivir and dexamethasone have become more valuable to us, as well as how drugs like hydroxychloroquine have become less useful.</p> <p><strong>What do we know about the potential for new treatment, such as convalescent plasma?</strong></p> <p>People who have survived COVID-19 have donated plasma, which may contain antibodies against the virus. In principle, the idea is that those antibodies could be protective for somebody who's infected with the virus and might reduce their risk of severe disease or death from COVID-19. Because there are a lot of people recovering from COVID-19, it has led to a lot of enthusiasm and immediate use of convalescent plasma to treat COVID-19 patients.</p> <p>Unfortunately, we aren't at the point where we know if that approach is beneficial. We have a lot of questions: Should we be using convalescent plasma early in the course of disease? Should we be reserving it for people who are critically ill? Is it okay to use it for patients who are not hospitalized? Is it best to use it only for people who require oxygen? Should we measure antibody levels in the plasma before we use it? And if so, what are the best levels of antibody that are therapeutic right now? We don't have great answers to those questions. There are some hints that giving it earlier is better and that higher antibody levels are better than lower levels based on experience to date from uncontrolled clinical studies.</p> <p>Right now, Vanderbilt is leading a nationwide study on convalescent plasma to see if it’s beneficial and if so, who is most likely to benefit. (Read more about the study <a href="https://news.vumc.org/2020/08/21/vumc-awarded-34-million-to-lead-nationwide-convalescent-plasma-study/">here</a>.) If convalescent plasma was not such a precious resource, it may be more likely that it would be given outside of a clinical trial. But we need to make sure we're using it wisely and that it works.</p> <p><strong>Back in April, <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/covid-19-antibody-testing-qa-dr-david-aronoff-importance-validity-accuracy">you answered questions about antibodies</a>. What do we know now about how long antibodies last and offer protection for people?</strong></p> <p>Now that we've had so many millions of people around the world infected with COVID-19, we continue to build evidence that not many people come back with symptoms from a re-infection from the virus. That strongly suggests that once people recover from COVID-19, their immune system protects them against a symptomatic re-infection. Recently, there was a report of an individual who appears to have gotten reinfected with a true new infection of the virus. It's interesting that this re-infection was picked up on asymptomatic screening relating to travel, but he wasn’t symptomatic.</p> <p>That again suggests that it’s similar to when people are immunized for influenza: They can get infected with influenza but tend to be less sick with it and maybe even asymptomatic. It also suggests that even though people have recovered from COVID-19, they might be able to be re-infected and still transmit the virus to other people.</p> <p>We're also learning that the presence or absence of antibodies against the virus in our blood doesn't always correlate with our past history of infection. So some people with COVID-19 infection are losing detectable antibodies from their blood several weeks to months following infection. That does not mean that they're not protected against reinfection. Our immune system is much more complex than simply antibodies circulating in our bloodstream. This is a virus that infects our airways, so we have lots of immune cells in our airwaves, nose, throat and lungs that protect us at the source of infection.</p> <p>Our understanding is getting more refined about antibodies and COVID-19, but there’s much we still don’t know. We're still not using antibodies to tell people that they're protected from re-infection or they can't be part of a chain of transmission. We're still not using antibodies to help people return to work. We're not even using antibodies to rule out that somebody had COVID-19 in the past, because they could have had COVID-19 in April and by now their antibody levels are gone. I always need to remind myself we're only eight months into this illness. It’s hard to use the term longterm in terms of anything with this virus, when we haven't even gotten a year under our belt.</p> <p><strong>Did previous research into the SARS CoV-1 virus help prepare scientists for SAR CoV-2? Has some of the previous research helped in the quest for a vaccine?</strong></p> <p>The SARS CoV-1 virus, the cause of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and the Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), helped us understand the potential for animal coronaviruses to hop into people and deposit disease. That led to increased efforts to monitor animal populations and prepare for a pandemic. Other non-coronaviruses like Ebola or Zika have also helped us understand the global threat of viral infections in general. And the funding of basic science research has led to the capacity to do rapid genome sequencing of viruses and the ability to share that information in real time. It helps tell us if a new virus is genetically a new virus, and whether it is changing over time.</p> <p>Right now, there's not great evidence of different strains of the SARS COV-2 virus associated with different illnesses in people, though that may turn out to be the case over time. This all speaks to why investing in basic science research, informatics and data sciences continues to be important: You never know when all of those elements will need to come together quickly to improve human health and save lives.</p> <p><strong>What do we know about the timeline for a vaccine that we might not have known in the spring? How do you feel about predictions that it could arrive soon?</strong></p> <p>I don’t frequently make predictions by looking at a calendar and saying, we're going to have a treatment or a vaccine by this particular date. That’s because as a physician scientist, I understand how uncertain our future is when it comes to finding something that's safe and effective and that will be available to all. We’re seeing a lot of resources being deployed to making a vaccine. In fact, the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/science/coronavirus-vaccine-tracker.html">coronavirus vaccine tracker</a> from <em>The New York Times</em> shows more than 100 preclinical vaccines, with nine in phase three studies.</p> <p>Right now Vanderbilt is participating in one major vaccine trial. (Read more about the trial <a href="https://news.vumc.org/2020/07/15/vanderbilt-university-medical-center-to-recruit-up-to-1000-volunteers-for-covid-19-vaccine-trial/">here</a>.) It will take time to see results, then that data has to be examined carefully by data safety monitoring boards. So, optimistically, I think we will be into 2021 before we can decide if the vaccines now in phase three studies are ready for prime time. If those trials are successful, the next stage is FDA approval. Then there has to be a clear path to manufacturing them at scale, a way to identify who should get the vaccines first and a plan for how they will be distributed. There's a lot that needs to be worked out, so I'm reluctant to say we'll have a vaccine by January 1st, or one by this time next year. But I'm not reluctant to say that I'm very enthusiastic that we will have a vaccine, and I'm excited to see all the candidates coming down the pipeline.</p> <p><strong>Why do you think so many vaccines are in the pipeline? Is it normal to have that many possible vaccines for a virus or is that unique to COVID-19?</strong></p> <p>Yes, it is unprecedented to have so many vaccine candidates working their way through pipeline, but that’s what happens when you have a global pandemic and money and resources are being poured into curing it. There's motivation around not only helping people, but also motivation to do something high impact like save the planet! Normally vaccine development takes a long time in part because you have to search for investors and raise capital between each phase. Those bottlenecks don't exist right now. Yes, there are over 100 ideas in the works, but most of them are early in preclinical trials. But that we’ve gotten this close in just eight months is remarkable.</p> <p>Until we have new treatments or new vaccines, people need to continue to do the fundamental things that keep us all safe and understand that every individual person's sacrifices make a huge difference. And that's the most protective weapon we have right now.</p> <div> <div> <div id="_com_6" language="JavaScript"> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/Aronoff_David-portrait-JR0-copy.jpg?itok=PCairUgL" width="576" height="384" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Tue, 15 Sep 2020 11:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 128 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com Practical Mask-Wearing Tips for Adults and Children https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/practical-mask-wearing-tips-adults-and-children <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Practical Mask-Wearing Tips for Adults and Children</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 09/14/2020 - 04:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/130" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Practical Mask-Wearing Tips for Adults and Children"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>You've probably seen the popular Vanderbilt Health <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0mY5xymS-Q">masking video</a> circulating on TV and social media. There's no question about it: Wearing face masks and engaging in other infection prevention methods are contributing to <a href="https://www.nashvillepost.com/business/health-care/article/21143184/covid19-update-1502-new-cases">incremental declines</a> in COVID-19 numbers for the Middle Tennessee region.</p> <p>But wearing a mask so frequently can lead to some unintended consequences, including skin irritations and breakouts. A <a href="https://voice.vumc.org/does-your-mask-irritate-your-face-doctors-offer-ideas-to-keep-your-skin-healthy/">recent article</a> in VUMC Voice offered a few hacks to keep your skin healthy. Those include:</p> <ul> <li>Wash your face with a skin cleanser containing salicylic acid at bedtime.</li> <li>Keep your mask clean.</li> <li>Ensure that your mask fits properly over your mouth and nose and isn’t too tight or too loose.</li> <li>Avoid makeup when wearing a mask.</li> <li>Use a gentle moisturizer every day.</li> </ul> <p>Convincing children and teens to wear masks is another tough task. Katherine L. Bennett, MEd, CCLS, a Certified Child Life Specialist at Monroe Carell, Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, recommends modeling good behavior first and foremost. "By helping children understand how wearing a mask fights the COVID-19 germ, they can learn that we all have an important role in helping our communities stay healthy," she writes in a <a href="https://www.mysouthernhealth.com/kids-masks-how-do-i-do-this/?utm_campaign=vmsh-newsletter-27-08-2020&amp;utm_source=marketo&amp;utm_medium=email">MySouthernHealth</a> article.</p> <p style="text-align:start"> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/iStock-1214220442.jpg?itok=W7WgIuWt" width="576" height="384" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 14 Sep 2020 09:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 130 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com MyMaternityHealth Delivers Savings and Satisfaction for Area Teachers https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/mymaternityhealth-delivers-savings-and-satisfaction-area-teachers <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">MyMaternityHealth Delivers Savings and Satisfaction for Area Teachers</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 09/09/2020 - 07:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/127" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to MyMaternityHealth Delivers Savings and Satisfaction for Area Teachers"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) <a href="https://select.vanderbilthealth.com/rs/995-AMQ-354/images/Bundles%20Press%20Release.pdf">announced today</a> that it has created MyHealth Bundles, a patient-centered, value-based approach to managing some of the most common and costly health conditions.</p> <p>MyHealth Bundles provide employers with more transparent, predictable pricing by prioritizing consistent care. The model encourages care coordination, reducing employers’ overall costs and building a concierge service experience. Employees also benefit, with MyHealth Bundles simplifying access to providers and streamlining appointments—supported by a patient navigator to answer questions and help guide the way. The model’s built-in efficiencies often result in lower out-of-pocket payments, too.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.vanderbilthealth.com/service/mymaternityhealth-employers">MyMaternityHealth</a> bundle is available now and combines maternity and select newborn services that an expectant mother and baby need for the entire length of the pregnancy—from the initial prenatal care visit through delivery and 12 weeks after delivery. VUMC has been piloting the MyMaternityHealth program with its own employees and families and certificated employees covered by the Metro Nashville Public Schools (MNPS) health plan.</p> <p>“All of our health plan decisions are about improving the health of our employees in order to improve the educational outcomes of our students, and we’ve proven that these two elements are closely related,” said David Hines, Executive Director of Benefits for MNPS. “The MyMaternityHealth program means we have healthier, happier babies and moms, and we’re reducing costs for our health plan at the same time.” </p> <p>The potential savings from MyMaternityHealth is so significant that MNPS has been able to lower the health plan member’s copayment to zero, saving employees at least $2,500 annually. The substantial savings coupled with the high-quality maternity experience are earning the MyMaternityHealth program high scores in MNPS employee satisfaction.</p> <p>“I can’t speak highly enough of my patient navigator,” said Lisa Shadrick, MNPS employee and bundles patient. “She’s my go-to. She was able to answer all my questions about the bundle and always got back to me immediately. It was also nice not to have to worry about finances … I didn’t have to worry about copays or bills or dealing with my insurance.”</p> <p>“The whole [pregnancy] has just been a lot less stressful this time,” another MNPS patient reported. “I know that I can reach out to my patient navigator and she’ll take care of it.”</p> <p>VUMC staff participating in the pilot have also been responding positively. “It was so great knowing that I could go to my patient navigator as a starting point,” one VUMC employee said. “Especially as a first-time mom, I didn’t know where to begin.”</p> <p>To provide convenience and peace of mind, telehealth visits are available for any qualified MyMaternityHealth bundle patient. Prenatal telehealth services include a complimentary prenatal telehealth kit consisting of a blood pressure cuff/monitor, hand-held fetal doppler, the option of a scale and in-person instruction on how to use the kit. After the baby is born, patients also have access to tele-lactation consultation services, another exclusive benefit of MyMaternityHealth.</p> <p>Want to learn more? Register to attend our upcoming webinar on <strong>Thursday, October 15: “</strong><strong><a href="https://select.vanderbilthealth.com/BundlesWebinar.html">Future-focused Healthcare: What Bundles Can Do for Employers</a>."</strong></p> <p>And don’t miss two new videos from the Vanderbilt Health Employer Solutions team:</p> <p>• An <a href="https://youtu.be/NUo7pTVYPZg">animated video</a> breaking down the benefits of the bundled payment model</p> <p>• A <a href="https://youtu.be/FtCvZpVUCKU">video interview </a>with David Hines, Executive Director of Benefits for MNPS, and Lisa Shadrick, MNPS employee, who recently delivered a bundle of joy without a bundle of bills!</p> <div> <div> <div id="_com_4" language="JavaScript"><a name="_msocom_4" id="_msocom_4"></a> <p> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/Lisa%20Shadrick_MaternityBundle.jpg?itok=DWrvS0E9" width="576" height="384" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-caption field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field__item">Metro Nashville Public School employee Lisa Shadrick and her husband, Eric, welcomed their new baby with the help of the MyMaternityHealth bundle.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 09 Sep 2020 12:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 127 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com Telehealth Coverage Expanded in Tennessee https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/telehealth-coverage-expanded-tennessee <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Telehealth Coverage Expanded in Tennessee</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 08/24/2020 - 15:52</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/126" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Telehealth Coverage Expanded in Tennessee"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee officially signed telehealth expansion into law on August 20. The revised law expands telehealth coverage—specifically, direct-to-patient coverage—through April 1, 2022. The legislation requires insurance companies to cover telemedicine services in place of in-person visits when medically necessary.</p> <p>Key takeaways include: </p> <ul> <li>Payment parity: Requires payors to reimburse at the same negotiated rate for a telehealth visit as an in-person visit until <b>April 1, 2022</b>.  </li> <li>Direct-to-patient coverage locations include the <b>patient’s home, place of employment or any other place the patient deems appropriat</b>e. </li> <li>Includes Commercial, TennCare and other state-funded plans</li> <li>Excludes Medicare, other federal payors and ERISA plans  </li> </ul> <p>As of now, direct-to-patient coverage dates are as follows: </p> <ul> <li>CMS, Medicare, other Federal Payors: October 23, 2020</li> <li><b>TennCare: April 1, 2022</b></li> <li>United Healthcare commercial: September 30</li> <li>United Healthcare Medicare Advantage: October 22 </li> <li>Humana: October 23 </li> <li>Cigna: December 31 </li> <li>Aetna and BCBS TN: ongoing</li> <li>BCBS Out of State: no date announced </li> </ul> <p>Commercial payors will likely announce updated coverage dates as a result of the revised law. Stay tuned to the Employer Insights blog for the latest information on telehealth coverage and other important laws affecting area employers.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 24 Aug 2020 20:52:25 +0000 roberjm7 126 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com 5 Ways to Nurture Connections in New Workplace Environments https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/5-ways-nurture-connections-new-workplace-environments <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">5 Ways to Nurture Connections in New Workplace Environments</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/21/2020 - 12:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/125" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to 5 Ways to Nurture Connections in New Workplace Environments"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Even if you're back in your offices after the COVID-19 quarantine, chances are those workplaces look a lot different, whether because some employees are working staggered hours, setting up more permanent work-from-home arrangements or dealing with far-flung clients. Many are missing the ease of workplace interaction and spontaneous conversations that occurred in hallways and break rooms. That lack of natural communication can cause productivity bumps and even depress morale.<br /> <br /> Though it’s harder to recreate the synchronicity of an office environment these days, it still can be done with renewed effort toward culture-building. Here are five ideas to help your employees create connections, even from a distance:</p> <p><strong>1. Communicate often via multiple channels.</strong> When it comes to status updates, project reports or any important download, “give a little more information than you think is necessary,” according to Chris Kaundart of <a href="https://blog.trello.com/remote-work-connections">Trello</a>, an online collaborative tool. Build in communication redundancies so you don’t risk employees missing out on essential news, particularly when some are in different locations and time zones. And ensure that anything related to human resources—particularly when it comes to employee health and safety—is communicated frequently, updated regularly and available through easy-to-access methods. Another good reminder from Trello when it comes to communication: “Always communicate with positive intent and assume others are, too.” Starting with a positive approach gives a better chance of a positive outcome.</p> <p><strong>2. Prioritize company transparency.</strong> It may be wise to discontinue or combine some meetings to combat video chat overload and Zoom fatigue, but make sure to keep regular all-hands calls on the books. These informational meetings don’t have to be elaborate productions, but they should provide opportunities for leaders to discuss company priorities and status of important projects, explain what’s on the horizon and listen to employee feedback. Think of these as uplifting, inspirational meetings—not places to detail a litany of employee mistakes. “Tell stories and share the impact of specific projects to help employees stay motivated,” <em><a href="https://www.fastcompany.com/90527857/how-to-create-serendipitous-employee-connections-while-remote">Fast Company</a> </em>recommends.</p> <p><strong>3. Plan regular coffee chats with colleagues. </strong>Reach out to someone you don’t know that well and initiate a conversation that intentionally doesn’t hinge on work. “Corporations have historically seen some of the biggest new ideas emerge,” Ben Waber of Humanyze told <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/%5Dhttps%3A//www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/06/09/magazine/remote-work-covid.html"><em>The New York Times</em></a>, “when two employees who usually didn’t talk suddenly, by chance, connected.” Though the altered workplaces of 2020 and beyond make random connections more difficult, technology can be used to create these cross-departmental connections.</p> <p><strong>4. Mix in fun whenever possible. </strong>Though watercoolers are now off-limits, many technology tools like Teams, Zoom, Slack and Basecamp offer virtual means to recreate back-and-forth chats and light-hearted communication. Set up channels for swapping music, movie or TV recommendations. Share recipes and takeout restaurant picks. Crowd-source ideas for new home office equipment or gardening tips. Show off pictures of your office mates—the human and furry variety. These specific channels perform a double-duty, as <em>Fast Company</em> reminds us: “Creating designated spaces prevents employees from clogging online business threads with nonwork banter.”</p> <p><strong>5. Don’t be afraid to upend “what’s always been done.”</strong> COVID-19 has caused multiple layers of disruption for your company, but consider ways that some of the lemons of disruption can be squeezed into the lemonade of good and sustainable change. Are there processes that could be more inclusive? Projects that could be smoother and more streamlined? Are there better ways for employees to connect and collaborate? Are there creative ways to motivate employee health and well-being?</p> <p>“There’s all kinds of habits and practices that develop that aren’t effective,” Stewart Butterfield, the chief executive of Slack communication software told <em><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/06/09/magazine/remote-work-covid.html">The New York Times</a></em>. “You think you can’t do something—and then you have to do it. And so it turns out you can.” Finding ways to reap the lessons of this difficult moment in time will help you and your employees find purpose and spark greater connection.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 21 Aug 2020 17:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 125 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com News Roundup: Connecting Employees to Better Health Habits https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/news-roundup-connecting-employees-better-health-habits <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">News Roundup: Connecting Employees to Better Health Habits</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/leelm1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">leelm1</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 08/18/2020 - 16:24</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/124" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to News Roundup: Connecting Employees to Better Health Habits"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The Vanderbilt Health Employer Solutions team frequently shares original articles and videos with employers that they can use to support their employees’ health and well-being. Recent stories have focused on preventive health, ideas for contending with stress and anxiety, and more. Here’s a recap of the latest:</p> <p><strong>• Priority on Prevention:</strong> To motivate employees to reach a higher bar in terms of their physical health and well-being, the team highlighted the need to <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/promoting-value-primary-care-provider">connect to a primary care provider</a> and <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/help-employees-get-back-game">schedule preventive health screenings</a>. We also shared a <a href="https://select.vanderbilthealth.com/ExecHealthPhys.html">new video</a> that took a deeper dive into the benefits of Vanderbilt Executive Health Physicals and the precautions this clinic is taking in light of COVID-19.</p> <p><strong>• Anxiety-Busting Tips: </strong>The pandemic has had a detrimental effect on the mental health of all Americans, with the Kaiser Family Foundation reporting 45% of American adults are experiencing increased anxiety and depression. A <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/5-ways-combat-pandemic-anxiety-your-employees">recent article</a> offered five ways to combat the constant undercurrent of COVID-19 stress.</p> <p><strong>•  Infectious Disease Recommendations:</strong> Last month, we shared <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/new-cdc-guidelines-covid-19-quarantine-and-return-work">new guidelines</a> from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for people who are self-isolating with COVID-19. We also shared a <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/video-series-highlights-guidance-vumc-infectious-disease-experts">video series</a> from Vanderbilt Health infectious disease experts.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/iStock-537417114.jpg?itok=kW2dCF9P" width="576" height="384" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Tue, 18 Aug 2020 21:24:44 +0000 leelm1 124 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com 'This Is What Caring Looks Like': New Video Promotes Benefits of Masks https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/what-caring-looks-new-video-promotes-benefits-masks <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">&#039;This Is What Caring Looks Like&#039;: New Video Promotes Benefits of Masks</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 08/12/2020 - 13:43</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/122" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to &#039;This Is What Caring Looks Like&#039;: New Video Promotes Benefits of Masks"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Did you know that Nashville's COVID-19 infection rate started dropping after the city's <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/nashville-public-health-order-mandating-masks-goes-effect">mask mandate</a> went into effect June 29? In fact, <a href="https://news.vumc.org/2020/08/10/new-analysis-finds-association-between-masking-requirements-and-slower-growth-in-covid-19-hospitalizations/">new research</a> from the Department of Health Policy at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Vanderbilt University Medical Center found a relationship between the growth of hospitalizations and masking requirements put in place across the state.</p> <p>Hospitals that have more than 75% of their patients from areas without masking requirements in place have seen a relatively faster increase in patients with COVID-19 than hospitals with higher percentages of patients from areas with masking requirements in place, the analysis revealed.</p> <p>Wearing a mask is one of the easiest and most effective things you can do to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Watch this <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0mY5xymS-Q">fun new video</a> from Vanderbilt Health—and spread the word to your employees and their families!</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 12 Aug 2020 18:43:52 +0000 roberjm7 122 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com VUMC Debuts Original Podcast Series Exploring Scientific Advancements https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/vumc-debuts-original-podcast-series-exploring-scientific-advancements <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">VUMC Debuts Original Podcast Series Exploring Scientific Advancements</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 08/12/2020 - 10:13</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/121" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to VUMC Debuts Original Podcast Series Exploring Scientific Advancements"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>This week Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) launched <strong>Vanderbilt Health DNA: Discoveries in Action</strong>, an original podcast series exploring the issues and scientific advancements shaping health, medicine and society. </p> <p>The 10-episode podcast series will uncover breakthroughs happening at Vanderbilt Health and dig deeper into innovative ideas from more than 30 of VUMC’s most visionary thinkers. Episodes will investigate topics such as the importance of combating unconscious bias in modern workplaces and communities; the cutting-edge science and philosophy behind neurosurgery; how technology can sync with patients and providers to more efficiently serve both; and the quest to eradicate and contain fast-moving infectious diseases such as COVID-19.</p> <p>"This is a pivotal time for medicine and science where people are looking for expertise and hope regarding the way forward," said Jeff Balser, MD, PhD, President and Chief Executive Officer of VUMC and Dean of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. "The podcast series provides insights that are grounded in the latest research and, perhaps most importantly, demonstrates the passion of our experts behind this work."</p> <p>The <a href="https://definingpersonalizedcare.vanderbilthealth.com/episode-1">first episode</a>, "The Futurist: Your Life, Your Health, Your Care," explores how COVID-19 adds a new dimension to personalized care. Dr. Balser is joined by Consuelo Wilkins, MD, MSCI, vice president and Associate Dean for Health Equity, and Bonnie Miller, MD, MMHC, former Executive Vice President for Educational Affairs and Senior Associate Dean for Health Sciences Education, to imagine a future in which learning and caring are integral to health.</p> <p>Read more about the podcast <a href="https://news.vumc.org/2020/08/11/listen-dna-podcast/">here</a>, and subscribe using the following links:<br /> Apple: <a data-attribute-index="4" href="https://lnkd.in/drzgvKp">https://lnkd.in/drzgvKp</a><br /> Google:<a data-attribute-index="5" href="https://lnkd.in/d_UatGj">https://lnkd.in/d_UatGj</a></p> <p style="text-align:start">Here is a list of episodes:</p> <p style="text-align:start">August 17, 2020<br /> EPISODE 2 - VACCINES: PANDEMICS VS. PROSPERITY<br /> Featuring: Dr. William Schaffner, Dr. Buddy Creech, Dr. James Crowe, Dr. Mark Denison<br /> Listen <a href="https://definingpersonalizedcare.vanderbilthealth.com/episode-2">here</a>.</p> <p style="text-align:start">August 24, 2020<br /> EPISODE 3 - THE LENSES WE WEAR: UNCONSCIOUS BIAS <br /> Featuring: Dr. Arie Nettles, Dr. Nancy Brown, Dr. Kyla Terhune</p> <p style="text-align:start">August 31, 2020<br /> EPISODE 4 - BEING HUMAN: NEUROSURGEONS ON THE UNKNOWN <br /> Featuring: Dr. Reid Thompson, Dr. Lola Chambless, Dr. Dario Englot</p> <p style="text-align:start">September 7, 2020<br /> EPISODE 5 - SHADOW INFLUENCE: IMPOSTER SYNDROME<br /> Featuring: Dr. Jenni Blackford, Dr. Maureen Gannon, Dr. Sara Horst</p> <p style="text-align:start">September 14, 2020<br /> EPISODE 6 - RIPPLE EFFECT: COVID-19 UPENDS HEALTH &amp; SOCIETY<br /> Featuring: Dr. David Aronoff, Dr. Alex Jahangir,  Dr. Consuelo Wilkins</p> <p style="text-align:start">September 21, 2020<br /> EPISODE 7 - THE GENOME FILES: HOW #BIGDATA TAILORS TREATMENT <br /> Featuring: Dr. Kevin Johnson,  Dr. Josh Denny, Dr. Yaa Kumah-Crystal</p> <p style="text-align:start">September 28, 2020<br /> EPISODE 8 - DR. SUPERMAN: DIVERSITY &amp; INCLUSION<br /> Featuring: Dr. Andre' Churchwell,  Dr. Jeffrey Upperman,  Kristy Sinkfield</p> <p style="text-align:start">October 5, 2020<br /> EPISODE 9 - EVERYBODY THRIVE NOW: WHY HEALTH POLICY MATTERS<br /> Featuring: Dr. Melinda Buntin,  Dr. Stephen Patrick, Dr. Stacie Dusetzina,  Cecilia Moore</p> <p style="text-align:start">October 12, 2020<br /> EPISODE 10 - MAGIC: REDCAP REVEALS LOCAL HEROES<br /> Featuring: Dr. Paul Harris, Selena Carpenter, Dr. Tamala Bradham<br />  </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 12 Aug 2020 15:13:46 +0000 roberjm7 121 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com 5 Ways to Combat Pandemic Anxiety in Your Employees https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/5-ways-combat-pandemic-anxiety-your-employees <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">5 Ways to Combat Pandemic Anxiety in Your Employees</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/07/2020 - 06:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/119" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to 5 Ways to Combat Pandemic Anxiety in Your Employees"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The pandemic has had a detrimental effect on the mental health of all Americans, with the <a href="https://www.kff.org/coronavirus-covid-19/issue-brief/the-implications-of-covid-19-for-mental-health-and-substance-use/">Kaiser Family Foundation</a> reporting 45% of American adults are experiencing increased anxiety and depression. June marked the third consecutive month of a negative score in the <a href="https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/americans-concerned-about-return-to-pre-pandemic-life-and-economy-301088255.html">Mental Health Index</a>, a survey of 5,000 American workers about their quality of life and mental health. “The findings show that even with parts of the country re-opening after nearly three months of lock down, financial risk and feelings of isolation remain the top threats to American employees' mental health,” a recent <em><a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/bryanrobinson/2020/07/12/no-one-is-exempt-from-pandemic-stress-state-of-mental-health-and-workplace-wellness/?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTTJSbFlURm1ZbU5sTURBMCIsInQiOiJmTENtMVwvS0VEMlZ1Nng0aWcyTGJuUzBxWXIwNW1lSU1pTWp6SG9keVo3TWFUeVgxcmtrVGE0WWJQcW0rWW9rNDlJdlF4YmtQcEkySlBDeXdKNkMraWc9PSJ9#434341c0306a">Forbes</a> </em>article said.</p> <p>How can you empower employees to combat burnout and mental health challenges, particularly during the pandemic? Here are five ideas:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Encourage employees to take their PTO.</strong> Perhaps some employees are waiting until it’s safe to take travel to use their vacation time, but it may be helpful for them to take some of that time off now. Taking a few breaks from work over the next few months can help you recharge your mental batteries, according to Jim Kendall, LCSW, CEAP, manager of Work-Life Connections for VUMC in a <a href="https://www.mysouthernhealth.com/how-to-combat-quarantine-fatigue/">recent article</a> from My Southern Health.</li> <li><strong>Inspire better self-care. </strong>Create a weekly email that offers anxiety-busting ideas such as setting a <a href="https://www.mysouthernhealth.com/sleep-habits-making-you-tired/">consistent sleep schedule</a>, learning to <a href="https://www.mysouthernhealth.com/meditation-how-to-meditate/">meditate</a> and kickstarting <a href="https://www.mysouthernhealth.com/category/food/recipes/">healthier eating habits</a>.</li> <li><strong>Promote exercise. </strong>Consider competitions—bolstered by small incentives—to inspire staff to increase their physical activity. Walking and easy hikes are <a href="https://www.mysouthernhealth.com/benefits-of-walking/ ">good options</a> for those employees who are just getting started on a fitness plan.</li> <li><strong>Urge your staff to take regular breaks from social media and the news</strong>, which churns out endless negative coverage. “Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting and mentally exhausting,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reminds us.</li> <li><strong>Offer resources for building resiliency.</strong> In addition to <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/resources-boosting-mental-and-physical-resiliency">articles</a> on the Employer Insights blog, there are a wealth of online resources for dealing with the emotional stress of the pandemic, such as the VUMC/AllianceBernstein <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/alliancebernstein-partners-vumc-psychologist-mental-health-podcast-series">Mental Health podcast series</a>; Harvard Medical School’s helpful <a href="https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/coping-with-coronavirus">video series</a>; timely articles and videos from the <a href="https://adaa.org/finding-help/coronavirus-anxiety-helpful-resources">Anxiety and Depression Association of America</a>; and a “Coping With Stress” <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/managing-stress-anxiety.html">mini-site</a> compiled by the <a>CDC</a>.</li> </ol> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/iStock-1216789482.jpg?itok=ZGQoyucM" width="576" height="384" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 07 Aug 2020 11:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 119 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com Vanderbilt Health Launches Cost Estimator Tool https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/vanderbilt-health-launches-cost-estimator-tool <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Vanderbilt Health Launches Cost Estimator Tool</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 08/06/2020 - 15:51</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/120" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Vanderbilt Health Launches Cost Estimator Tool"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The new Vanderbilt Health website now features an out-of-pocket cost estimator for many hospital and professional services offered by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). Patients type their desired health services or procedures into the <a href="https://www.vanderbilthealth.com/information/estimates-and-charges">new online too</a><a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/%5Dhttps%3A//myhealth.app.vumc.org/MyChartPRD/GuestEstimates/AcceptDisclaimer?svcArea=Hh2715dWdCi0Qp8/yAyz2w%3D%3D&amp;isMultiSA=False">l</a>, and it will immediate generate estimates on any out-of-pocket charges they will owe.</p> <p>“There is significant frustration among consumers about costs and the lack of price transparency in health care. Committed to help address this issue, we have been able to accomplish an important goal of placing information about many out-of-pocket costs at the fingertips of patients and their families,” said Cecelia Moore, MHA, CPA, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer. “The price estimator tool empowers patients to make good decisions both clinically and financially,” echoed Heather Dunn, Vice President for VUMC Revenue Cycle Services and leader of the project.</p> <p data-gtm-vis-has-fired-1404321_535="1">Vanderbilt Health provides estimates of out-of-pocket costs in the following ways:</p> <ul data-gtm-vis-has-fired-1404321_535="1"> <li data-gtm-vis-has-fired-1404321_535="1">If you've scheduled a visit or procedure, we will give you an estimate in your My Health at Vanderbilt online account or by phone. </li> <li data-gtm-vis-has-fired-1404321_535="1">If you are a patient, you can create estimates of out-of-pocket costs (for scheduled or not-yet scheduled visits) through your My Health at Vanderbilt account. This estimate will take into account your insurance coverage and any co-pays, co-insurance or deductibles you may owe. (Care you have received or paid for very recently may not be factored into the estimate.) </li> <li data-gtm-vis-has-fired-1404321_535="1">If you are not yet a patient at Vanderbilt, you can create a “guest” estimate online.<strong data-gtm-vis-has-fired-1404321_535="1"> </strong>You will need to enter your insurance information. The accuracy of the estimate will depend on the accuracy of the information you enter.</li> </ul> <p>Learn more and watch a video about the price estimator <a href="https://news.vumc.org/2020/08/04/vanderbilthealth-com-launches-out-of-pocket-cost-estimator/">here</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 06 Aug 2020 20:51:09 +0000 roberjm7 120 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com New CDC Guidelines for COVID-19 Quarantine and Return to Work https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/new-cdc-guidelines-covid-19-quarantine-and-return-work <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">New CDC Guidelines for COVID-19 Quarantine and Return to Work</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 07/23/2020 - 17:04</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/118" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to New CDC Guidelines for COVID-19 Quarantine and Return to Work"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>On Friday, July 17, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated its guidelines for people who are self-isolating with COVID-19 to prevent transmission of the virus. To limit unnecessary prolonged isolation and unnecessary use of lab tests, the latest guidelines recommend:</p> <ul> <li>The removal of the need for testing for clearance to return to work.</li> <li>Allowing most individuals with COVID-19 to be cleared to return to work after 10 days, assuming they have not had a fever for at least 24 hours and their symptoms have improved. If the person was sick enough to be hospitalized or if the person is severely immunocompromised, then this changes to 20 days.</li> <li>Not retesting persons with a positive testing result for the next 90 days after initial diagnosis unless they have new symptoms without an alternative diagnosis.</li> </ul> <p>The guidelines offer an isolation approach based on symptoms, an isolation approach based on testing, and an isolation approach based on time. Except for rare situations, a test-based strategy is no longer recommended to determine when a person can return to work.</p> <p><strong>Symptom-based approach:</strong> People with COVID-19 who have symptoms may discontinue isolation 10 days after the symptoms first appeared so long as 24 hours have passed since the last fever without the use of fever-reducing medications, and if symptoms such as coughing and shortness of breath have improved.</p> <p><strong>Testing-based approach:</strong> People with COVID-19 symptoms may discontinue isolation if a fever has passed without the use of medication, if there is an improvement in symptoms, and if tests taken more than 24 hours apart come back negative.</p> <p><strong>Time-based approach (no symptoms): </strong>People without symptoms who test positive for COVID-19 may discontinue isolation at least 10 days after the date of their first positive COVID-19 diagnostic test if they have not developed symptoms since their positive test. If they develop symptoms, then the symptom-based or test-based strategy should be used. “Because symptoms cannot be used to gauge where these individuals are in the course of their illness, it is possible that the duration of viral shedding [the ability to pass the virus to someone else] could be longer or shorter than 10 days after their first positive test,” the CDC says.</p> <p>The guidelines also emphasize that serologic, or antibody, testing should <strong>not</strong> be used to establish the presence or absence of COVID-19 infection or reinfection.</p> <p>Read all the recommendations <a href="https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgo.vanderbilthealth.com%2Ff00da060sh00aM4PAWQRw0Y&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cjamie.roberts%40vumc.org%7C8b309b818f0e4f1cfe6808d82f191b97%7Cef57503014244ed8b83c12c533d879ab%7C0%7C0%7C637311132163688419&amp;sdata=hw7thgFGwEmG%2Bq8NWwZOMsei%2Fnqh3%2B3CKg9uELjG4E0%3D&amp;reserved=0" id="" originalsrc="https://go.vanderbilthealth.com/f00da060sh00aM4PAWQRw0Y" shash="U2c5m3ANRNMfWy3RdqH5Ic2dHC2nMjukaNbiwpYAXG76O5pe70eRLFEoshpuhJVCf17lyHRPXZj9Z/hbY2EgGhQgcWl6vu/Eg01keUd9QZ8aJw9jQeAUF9OHYuacZV+s61wbSwT/kwrck01ps7ODz374z6IThrk5XMUJwtIGvMg=" target="_blank">here</a>, and please reach out to the <a href="https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgo.vanderbilthealth.com%2FXa60wSM0W000QdYsP04aAi0&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cjamie.roberts%40vumc.org%7C8b309b818f0e4f1cfe6808d82f191b97%7Cef57503014244ed8b83c12c533d879ab%7C0%7C0%7C637311132163688419&amp;sdata=n%2BM7vOgmQRafigO518SqDOCrPRYU2BOQIwyFMOpQJNU%3D&amp;reserved=0" id="" originalsrc="https://go.vanderbilthealth.com/Xa60wSM0W000QdYsP04aAi0" shash="smPDWDb+RJ9+qQKum0I3dTHebt9qFWjgzKw703eb52VQ7GPJn1xUiQt7DGjJED4mMME22a38prHtj+OcBh0Sh4wWnqsXNgxWwg7hNMpnFaWSflmhOkXNr1b6dnomAmdCBP29JarJ9hrw9foSMIr1H+WVBjtHro837hed9rhzUvQ=" target="_blank">Vanderbilt Health Employer Solutions</a> team with any questions.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Thu, 23 Jul 2020 22:04:34 +0000 roberjm7 118 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com Help Employees Get Back in the Game https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/help-employees-get-back-game <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Help Employees Get Back in the Game</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/17/2020 - 06:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/117" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Help Employees Get Back in the Game"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The pandemic dashed the hopes and dreams of Olympians who had trained and sacrificed for years to compete in the 2020 Summer Games. But those who will succeed in Tokyo in 2021 are using this time of adversity to stay fit and train hard to get faster, higher and stronger.</p> <p>Of course, Olympic athletes aren't the only ones facing disappointment and adversity. The pandemic has been difficult for everyone, triggering <a href="https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2020/07/417951/physical-activity-dropped-worldwide-during-covid-19-raising-concerns-health">a decrease</a> in physical fitness and <a href="https://mhanational.org/covid19">an increase</a> in mental health issues. To prevent physical inactivity and anxiety from cascading to greater health problems, now is the time to motivate employees to reach a higher bar in terms of their physical health and well-being. Here are three ideas to help employees from the C-suite to the front lines get on track to better health:</p> <p><strong>Explore advanced health physicals and coaching for executives. </strong>Facing difficult decisions and working long hours in less-than-ideal circumstances, your business’ higher-level staff and senior executives have been experiencing high levels of stress in the last four months. An escalated and more comprehensive level of care may be needed to keep their health and well-being in premium shape.</p> <p><a href="https://www.vanderbilthealth.com/executivehealthandwellness/53203">Vanderbilt Executive Health Physicals</a> help busy leaders make the best use of their limited time by working with executives to schedule a personalized annual physical, including all important preventive screenings, lab work and testing, in a single half-day session when it’s most convenient. The personalized, four-hour Executive Health Physical includes a full medical assessment, same-day testing and consultation, and a personalized health and wellness strategy. Learn more about the program and the measures this clinic is taking to keep patients safe and healthy during the pandemic in this <a href="https://select.vanderbilthealth.com/5900-414-0238-_ExecPhysCOVIDLead-B2B_02-TY.html">video</a>.</p> <p><strong>Encourage employees to find a primary care provider (PCP).</strong> The number of employees without a PCP is as high as 16% to 20% of the total population, according to one major healthcare payer. Though the percentage is higher among adults age 18-39, the large number of adults over 40 without a PCP is a more alarming trend since this population is at a higher risk of chronic conditions. Children without a PCP are also at risk because they need that healthcare connection to track annual wellness milestones and administer vaccinations.</p> <p>COVID-19 has underscored the value of a PCP, who streamlines the healthcare journey and delivers care targeted to individuals’ needs. A PCP can be the first call for healthcare questions or problems, they can detect early signs of illness, and they can refer patients to a specialist if needed. Consider additional advantages of a PCP <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/promoting-value-primary-care-provider">here</a>.</p> <p><strong>Design benefits to focus on prevention.</strong> Recent shelter-in-place restrictions have caused the rate of preventive cancer screenings to <a href="https://www.healthline.com/health-news/important-cancer-screenings-have-decreased-during-covid-19">dip precipitously</a>. A report from the <a href="https://ehrn.org/wp-content/uploads/Preventive-Cancer-Screenings-during-COVID-19-Pandemic.pdf">Epic Health Research Network</a> discovered that screening rates for cervical, breast cancer and colorectal cancer screenings fell between 86–94% in March compared to the 2017 to 2019 averages.</p> <p>It’s important to encourage your employees to reschedule these cancer screenings, as well as other annual wellness visits and regular checkups, to reduce the chance of preventable chronic diseases and catch health issues before they turn into larger challenges. Boost preventive care adoption among employees by fully explaining the benefits of preventive healthcare and regularly communicating the specific services offered by your company’s health plan.</p> <p>And there’s no time like the present to focus on preventive care: Vanderbilt Health has restarted surgeries, procedures and clinic visits that had been paused or delayed. For those a little apprehensive about refreshing their healthcare regimen, Vanderbilt Health has put in place <a href="https://vanderbilthealth.com/patientandvisitorinfo/54746?utm_source=vh_alert_banner&amp;_ga=2.223827612.661630627.1594654167-1881930374.1590531938">safety procedures</a> to ease the mind of patients and visitors and ramped up its <a href="https://vanderbilthealth.com/telemedicine/">telehealth capabilities</a> for certain appointments that can take place at home.</p> <div> <div> <div id="_com_2" language="JavaScript"> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/iStock-1161313454.jpg?itok=p2sFESDz" width="576" height="384" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 17 Jul 2020 11:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 117 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com Video Series Highlights Guidance From VUMC Infectious Disease Experts https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/video-series-highlights-guidance-vumc-infectious-disease-experts <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Video Series Highlights Guidance From VUMC Infectious Disease Experts</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/15/2020 - 10:14</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/116" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Video Series Highlights Guidance From VUMC Infectious Disease Experts"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>As part of their video series on dealing with the pandemic, Vanderbilt Health infectious disease experts Dr. William Schaffner and Dr. Tom Talbot discuss the latest health and safety guidance. The videos include best practices on:</p> <p>• practical risk assessment of everyday activities in reducing the risk of spreading COVID-19<br /> • why wearing a mask in public helps reduce the risk of spreading the coronavirus that causes COVID-19<br /> • how to talk to colleagues about wearing a mask<br /> • safe ways to take a mask break during work<br /> • precautions being taken at Vanderbilt University Medical Center</p> <p>View the entire series of videos <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpzjAeZsBZ0&amp;list=PLucLRYfUxMGh5RjUpsT2zlvo0tS98kSd1&amp;index=7">here</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/Screen%20Shot%202020-07-15%20at%201.25.34%20PM.png?itok=08QwvRI6" width="576" height="310" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 15 Jul 2020 15:14:01 +0000 roberjm7 116 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com Promoting the Value of a Primary Care Provider https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/promoting-value-primary-care-provider <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Promoting the Value of a Primary Care Provider</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/15/2020 - 09:20</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/115" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Promoting the Value of a Primary Care Provider"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The number of patients in the United States with a primary care provider (PCP) declined by 2% in a little over a decade, according to <a>a </a><a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-pcp-trends/declining-numbers-of-americans-have-a-primary-care-provider-idUSKBN1YK1Z4">study</a> published in a 2019 issue of J<em>AMA Internal Medicine</em>. Those millions spanned Americans of all ages, except for those in their 80s, researchers said.</p> <p>The number of employees without a PCP—as high as 16% to 20% of the total population, according to one major healthcare payer—has long been a challenge for HR leaders. Though the percentage is higher among adults age 18-39, the large number of adults over 40 without a PCP is a more alarming trend since this population is at a higher risk of chronic conditions. Children without a PCP are also at risk because they need that healthcare connection to track annual wellness milestones and administer vaccinations.</p> <p>The <em><a href="https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/10.1377/hlthaff.27.1.151">Journal of Health Affairs</a> </em>and <em><a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/195202">JAMA</a> </em>have published research that shows a clear connection between having a PCP and better management of chronic conditions, a higher level of patient satisfaction and lower costs. The COVID-19 pandemic has also accentuated the drastic need for individuals to have a PCP whom they can call with concerns, said Cindy Powell, MD, medical director of the Vanderbilt Health Affiliated Network. “Many of the people calling in to COVID hotlines had no idea what to do or where to go for care without the support of a PCP.” </p> <p>Whether answering health questions or conducting preventive screenings for cancer and other conditions, a PCP helps patients on a journey toward better health—but sometimes a nudge is necessary to help employees take the first step. “It takes a team effort to encourage employees to find a ‘medical home’ that prioritizes wellness and reduces the incident of preventable chronic diseases,” Dr. Powell said.</p> <p>Here are a few ways to help your employees connect to a PCP:</p> <p>• Promote the value of preventive care. Building a long-term, ongoing relationship with a PCP forms the foundation for good health. PCPs can be the first call for healthcare questions or problems, they can detect early signs of illness, and they can refer patients to a specialist if needed. With access to a patient’s entire record—from their electronic medical record and insurance claims—a PCP can get a more comprehensive view of the patient’s overall health and gain visibility into any gaps in their care.</p> <p>• Underscore the cost savings. Regular checkups and preventive screenings to catch health issues before they turn into a larger problem all add up to less out-of-pocket costs. Research also shows that people connected to a PCP are less likely to have major unexpected health costs.</p> <p>• Provide incentives. Consider providing an annual wellness bonus or other incentive to convince employees to find a PCP.</p> <p>• Make it mandatory for 2021 benefits. Consider requiring employees to find a PCP to encourage the establishment of a medical home.</p> <div> <div> <div id="_com_3" language="JavaScript"> <p> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/Call%20Out%20Image-Thank%20You%20Email.jpg?itok=vcbxrmR4" width="576" height="384" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 15 Jul 2020 14:20:40 +0000 roberjm7 115 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com Your Source for Employer Strategy and Support https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/your-source-employer-strategy-and-support <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Your Source for Employer Strategy and Support</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/15/2020 - 06:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/113" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Your Source for Employer Strategy and Support"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The Vanderbilt Health Employer Solutions team is supporting local businesses with back-to-work health and safety policies, insights from a local business leader, best practices for contact tracing, and survey data to assist in 2021 health plan decision-making. Here’s a look at the latest guidance:</p> <p>• <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/first-its-kind-program-creates-safer-nashville-employees-visitors">Advice on a healthy and safe restart</a>. Getting back to work in the midst of the pandemic hasn’t been easy for Nashville-area employers, but 450+ businesses who recently signed the <a href="https://www.goodtogonashville.com">Good to Go</a> pledge have reopened with a big assist from VUMC Infectious Disease experts. Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp. launched the free Good to Go program in collaboration with Vanderbilt Health and Ryman Hospitality Properties to encourage businesses to follow health standards and prioritize infectious disease prevention. (Look out for the eye-catching Good to Go signage around town!)</p> <p>• <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/back-work-constant-vigilance-qa-shawn-smith-vice-president-human-resources">Insights from a fellow business leader</a>. Ryman Hospitality Properties has reopened some of its businesses using health and safety guidance provided by VUMC, <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/ryman-hospitality-partners-and-vumc-tune-safe-and-healthy-restart-business">named its wellness advisor</a> in May. We talked to Shawn Smith, Vice President of Human Resources at Ryman Hospitality Properties, about what the company has learned in the first weeks of opening with revised operating standards and enhanced cleaning procedures.</p> <p>• <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/how-support-effective-contact-tracing-your-community">The 411 on contact tracing</a>. We explain the significance of contact tracing, outlining VUMC’s efforts to curtail the spread of COVID-19 with our own employees and offering guidelines to help employers develop their own scalable plans.</p> <p>• <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/covid-19-survey-reveals-close-half-employers-enhancing-health-wellness">A concentration on employee mental health</a>. Despite the financial pinch of COVID-19, many employers are finding ways to protect the emotional well-being of their employees and make mental wellness an important aspect of 2021 healthcare benefits, according to a recent Willis Tower Watson survey.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/masks%20in%20the%20office.jpg?itok=e7o4xEiI" width="576" height="392" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 15 Jul 2020 11:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 113 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com The Escalation of Hearing Loss in the Workforce: David Haynes, MD, Discusses What’s Happening and How to Help https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/escalation-hearing-loss-workforce-david-haynes-md-discusses-whats-happening <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">The Escalation of Hearing Loss in the Workforce: David Haynes, MD, Discusses What’s Happening and How to Help</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/15/2020 - 06:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/114" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to The Escalation of Hearing Loss in the Workforce: David Haynes, MD, Discusses What’s Happening and How to Help"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>As our global population ages and many older workers delay retirement, a company’s roster is more likely to include employees with significant hearing loss. According to the National Institutes on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, <a href="https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/statistics/quick-statistics-hearing#3">37.5 million American adults</a> (15%) report some trouble hearing, with the greatest amount of hearing loss in the 60–69 age group.</p> <p>Adults with hearing impairment suffer from adverse consequences in interpersonal communication and emotional well-being, often leading to depression, difficulties in relationships, occupational stress and reduced productivity. In fact, “those who lose their hearing later in life, and whose jobs depend on effective communication, run the risk of eventually losing their jobs if satisfactory accommodations … are not instituted,” write Robert A. Dobie and Susan B. Van Hemel in their research work, <a href="https://www.nap.edu/read/11099/chapter/8"><em>Hearing Loss</em></a>.</p> <div> <div id="_com_2" language="JavaScript"><a name="_msocom_2" id="_msocom_2"></a> <p>Receiving a cochlear implant can be a life-changing experience for these individuals, says David Haynes, MD, professor of Otolaryngology, Neurosurgery, and Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. But overly complicated and time-consuming healthcare protocols have created barriers that prevent some hearing-impaired employees from getting the help they need.</p> </div> </div> <p><em>Employer Insights</em> spoke with Dr. Haynes about overcoming these barriers as well as his role in building <a href="https://select.vanderbilthealth.com/Cochlear_Implant_Bundle.html">MyHearingHealth</a>, a new Vanderbilt Health bundles program that provides employees with simplified access to cochlear implant surgery. The offering—set for an October 2020 debut— eliminates unnecessary appointments and travel and is streamlined to a single-day experience in many cases. MyHearingHealth’s highly experienced clinical team will not only enable a fast and convenient care experience for employees with hearing impairment, but the optimized process will also deliver predictable and transparent costs for employers.</p> <p>Dr. Haynes gave a sneak peek of the enhanced cochlear implant surgical experience in the following Q&amp;A:</p> <p><strong>Can you describe the stigma around hearing loss? What can help overcome those misperceptions?</strong></p> <p>It's amazing how many people with hearing loss don’t want to wear a hearing aid, but I hope this is a stigma we can address within my lifetime. It’s a cultural issue: If you need glasses, you don’t walk around without them, even though they’re much more obvious than a hearing aid would be. Even though people might be ok with glasses that are more visible on their face, they don’t want to be seen with a hearing aid. <p></p></p> <p>As we move toward restoration of hearing through other means, I think that perception will change. For example, a child may not be willing to wear a hearing aid but is more than willing to wear wireless headphones. The makers of iPods are already putting amplifiers into their devices to aid those with hearing loss. Perhaps this means the kids of tomorrow will wear iPods to classes for the purposes of hearing better and no one will think anything of it. These kinds of innovations are transformative. Technology that enhances connectivity through our ears is going to happen pretty quickly. And once it does, the concept of wearing hearing aids and implanting cochlear devices are going to become much more commonplace.<span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Cambria, serif;"><p></p></span></p> <p><strong>Is there a growing prevalence of hearing damage in younger people because of various environmental issues or because of the use of headphones?</strong></p> <p>Theoretically, a 40-year-old now has been exposed to more noise than a 40-year-old in the 1940s, but there’s also more knowledge today that noise can be harmful. Occupational health programs are checking sound levels and employees’ hearing more often and recommending appropriate hearing protection devices.</p> <p>As for headphones, I think most people are smart enough not to blare them. I wear them, too. The type of headphone matters. You would assume the bigger ones that fit relatively tightly around your ear would be so much worse, but the reality is that the smaller ones that fit poorly are worse. They are actually designed to play a louder level of sound to overcome environmental noise. So, you're better off with the big ones that actually block out all environmental sound. Technologies are improving so you can set the maximum decibel level of a headphone to shut off if it exceeds that.</p> <p>Hearing loss is extremely prevalent but only 15–18% of those who need a hearing aid have gotten them. Even worse, only 4% of those who need a cochlear implant have gotten this technology. There's room for improvement, and with awareness and screening campaigns, we’re trying to let people know that there’s treatment and it can be easier than they think.</p> <p><strong>How can you break down the barriers and convince people of the benefits of cochlear implants?</strong></p> <p>We’re studying the barriers, which include those cultural perceptions around hearing loss as we mentioned, as well as a lack of knowledge and awareness. The FDA first approved cochlear implants in the mid-1980s to treat hearing loss in adults. But 40 years after FDA approval, we’re only placing them in 4% of the people who could benefit from them. It’s hard to imagine saying, “We have a treatment that restores sight,” but only a small group of people who are blind take advantage of it.</p> <p>The cochlear implant bundle is a way to break down some of the barriers that patients have described to us. For patients who have difficulty understanding conversations, an implant can provide a greater benefit than hearing aids that simply make sounds louder. As technology improves, we will be able to implant more and more people with differing levels of hearing loss.</p> <p><strong>How has the population of eligible candidates changed from when you first started implanting cochlear devices?</strong></p> <p>When I first started performing these surgeries, an implant candidate had to be completely deaf with no detectable hearing of any kind. That’s because the FDA feared that if you implanted a device in someone who has some hearing and it didn’t work, you would make their hearing worse.</p> <p>Now, we're implanting patients who have what we call residual hearing, which means they have enough hearing to benefit from hearing aids, but they’re not getting enough benefit from them. The implant steps up those advantages. Today, highly performing processing devices are being placed in patients with differing levels of hearing impairment, and it’s launching success stories to the forefront.</p> <p>Length of deafness may play a role in performance. When a person who has been deaf for 40 years gets a cochlear implant, he or she may not show as much benefit as one with shorter periods of impairment. Yet, this period is negated in some ways by people whose ears have been primed by wearing hearing aids and are now ready to receive enhanced sound.</p> <p>Here’s a typical scenario: A group of guys regularly plays golf together. Fred has the worst hearing of the foursome. But then he gets a cochlear implant and now he has the best hearing. All of a sudden, his friends want to get a cochlear implant, too. More examples of this kind of enhanced hearing performance are starting to get out there. (Read about one patient’s successful experience <a href="https://news.vumc.org/2020/01/09/same-day-cochlear-implant-surgeries-reduce-travel-burden-wait-times/">here</a>.)</p> <p><strong>What can a patient expect from the MyHearingHealth experience?</strong></p> <p>The cochlear implant surgery experience used to be a long process that involved multiple players and would take weeks and even months to be complete. Now we've optimized it to a same-day process. If you would have told me back in the early days of cochlear implants that we could get the process down to one-hour operation all done in a single day, I wouldn’t have believed it.</p> <p>We have built in so many efficiencies and can coordinate everything patients need in a much shorter period of time. Patients don’t have to travel to us 10 times for a CT, an MRI, and to visit with a doctor and audiologists just for one surgery—it can happen all in one to three days. In some situations, all the necessary prep work can be done in the morning, and surgery can be in the afternoon. We’re actually able to do much of a patient’s prep by telehealth, which gives us the ability to have a much more relaxed experience the day of surgery. By beginning their care before they arrive, patients show up for surgery very informed. We’re communicating with them regularly and providing them with helpful educational videos. These videos aren’t substitutes for face-to-face discussions but rather they enhance our instruction. (Learn more about the process <a href="https://select.vanderbilthealth.com/Cochlear_Implant_Bundle.html">here</a>.)</p> <p>The cochlear implant bundles experience is life-changing. It makes these people better employees, better spouses, better fathers and mothers, and better friends. When you realize that these astounding stories are only told by 4% of those who could be getting the benefit, you want more people to know.</p> <p><strong>What do you see for the future of hearing devices?</strong></p> <p>I'm a big believer in technology, and you can think of so many situations where technology can outperform human performance. Night vision glasses enable the human eye to see at night, for example. A hearing aid can’t yet outperform a regular hearing ear, but that could change. With some of the research that's being done, it's not farfetched to think that sometime in the future an implant patient could hear even better than normal.</p> <p>To learn more about the features of Vanderbilt Health’s innovative MyHearingHealth and how the experience can help your workforce, click <a href="https://select.vanderbilthealth.com/Cochlear_Implant_Bundle.html">here</a>.</p> <div> <div> <div id="_com_2" language="JavaScript"> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/hearing%20test%20photo.jpg?itok=iu9KBwUp" width="576" height="384" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Wed, 15 Jul 2020 11:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 114 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com Back to Work With Constant Vigilance: Q&A With Shawn Smith, Vice President of Human Resources for Ryman Hospitality Properties https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/back-work-constant-vigilance-qa-shawn-smith-vice-president-human-resources <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Back to Work With Constant Vigilance: Q&amp;A With Shawn Smith, Vice President of Human Resources for Ryman Hospitality Properties</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 06/30/2020 - 06:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/112" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Back to Work With Constant Vigilance: Q&amp;A With Shawn Smith, Vice President of Human Resources for Ryman Hospitality Properties"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Ryman Hospitality Properties recently reopened some of its businesses using health and safety guidance provided by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), which was named its <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/ryman-hospitality-partners-and-vumc-tune-safe-and-healthy-restart-business">wellness adviso</a><a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/%5Dhttps%3A//employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/ryman-hospitality-partners-and-vumc-tune-safe-and-healthy-restart-business">r</a> in May. We talked to Shawn Smith, Vice President of Human Resources, about what the company has learned in the first weeks of opening with revised operating standards and enhanced cleaning procedures.</p> <p><strong>Which of your business lines are back?</strong></p> <p>We have now successfully reopened up all of our Ole Red restaurants, the most recent being our new Orlando facility on June 19. We first reopened the Ole Red in Tishomingo, Okla., then Gatlinburg and then Nashville. We’ve also reopened Gaylord Opryland, Gaylord Palms, Gaylord Rockies and Gaylord Texan, and customer feedback has been positive. And on Friday, June 26, we reopened the Grand Ole Opry and the Ryman Auditorium for tours that follow Nashville health and safety guidelines. We don’t know when concerts and other public events at the Grand Ole Opry and the Ryman Auditorium will come back since many things are still on pause.</p> <p><strong>How are operations going with the new safety plan in place?</strong></p> <p>Our director of leadership and training took the guidance from the VUMC Infectious Diseases department and transformed it into a remote, online training program that we could use at all our venues. It is amazing. All that effort helped people breathe a little easier and alleviate worry.</p> <p>Employees have really appreciated the level of meaningfulness that we've put into the return-to-work strategy. Obviously, the partnership with Vanderbilt has been huge. We’re hearing really good feedback from employees and customers throughout every reopening. They can really see what we've done to make sure it's a safe environment. We're taking good care of our employees, who in turn are taking good care of our guests. So, it's been just very positive on all fronts.</p> <p><strong>What are some of the most common things that customers respond to? Do they comment about any of the safety guidelines?</strong></p> <p>Customers see that our employees are wearing masks and they see the daily sticker on our employees that indicates, “I’ve been temperature-screened, and I'm ready to work.” They notice the high-quality signage. They also see the six-feet-apart spacing and the limiting of large groups and congregating in the bathrooms. We're really trying to help our customers stay true to everything we’re training our employees to do.</p> <p>In guest feedback, what's resonated is that they feel comfortable coming into our environment. Customers have been very appreciative of our level of safety standards.</p> <p>As we reopen Grand Ole Opry and Ryman tours, we’ll learn more about how to communicate with customers. Now that the <a href="https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/nashville-public-health-order-mandating-masks-goes-effect">mask mandate</a> is in place for Davidson County, we are having to pivot and are now updating how we manage our customers on the Nashville front.</p> <p><strong>What would you want your fellow HR leaders to know as they move forward and their business get back to work?</strong></p> <p>I can't say it enough: The first thing is to find a trusted health and wellness source with which you can partner. We feel fortunate that we're able to make decisions with the help of the VUMC Infectious Diseases department. You can’t get much better than that.</p> <p>Obviously, not everyone would be able to partner with Vanderbilt, but everyone can find an ongoing health and wellness consultant who can help you access and aggregate all the many resources out there.  As you recall, especially at the beginning of the pandemic, there was so much information everywhere. As HR leaders, we were trying to figure out which guidance we should follow from all that we were seeing.</p> <p>We’re in a calmer space right now, but at the beginning, it seemed like we were in constant motion. That’s the beauty of the wellness advisor relationship: When variables change, you’ve got a source to lean on to help you be prepared.</p> <p>Second, be flexible. Those of us in HR can sometimes be very black and white thinkers, and we can be hesitant to make a lot of changes if we don't have to. We think that we've got a policy for everything else, so why can’t we make one for this situation, too? But with the pandemic, you have to throw all that out the window and be flexible as you take in lots of new information.</p> <p>Third, build a core team that can make decisions quickly. Think of it in terms of an emergency management team. We built a core team of leaders in HR, employee relations, training and leadership, and communications who had the authority and empowerment to drive decisions quickly and get the word out throughout the rest of the organization. Especially at the beginning, things were happening at this crazy, fast-paced speed, so we didn’t have time to socialize big policy changes through many layers like we would normally would. Because we often had to react in the moment, we needed to build a team and an infrastructure that made us feel more confident in making critical decisions very quickly and efficiently.</p> <p>Finally, keep the information flowing efficiently. Things can get sideways fast if you've got too many cooks in the kitchen.  It’s also a good idea to have a single liaison to your wellness advisor. With one person as the conduit, you won’t have a bunch of people coming at your vendor in multiple, perhaps contradictory ways.</p> <p><strong>Has COVID-19 changed your perspective on workplace physical and mental health? Is it going to change anything about your culture as a company?</strong></p> <p>We've always had good resources to promote total wellbeing and wellness. We have onsite gyms and fitness classes, nice workspaces, and good benefit plans. But the mental health piece is something that we can all get better at providing, and the need for it has been highlighted much more so through this pandemic.</p> <p><strong>How flexible do you think your corporate work environment will be going forward?</strong></p> <p>We’re opening up opportunities for people to be more flexible with their schedule. This situation proved that we can work remotely, and we can do it well. We eventually will be asked to come back to the corporate office, but there will be a lot greater flexibility knowing the work can still get done at home. That flexibility will go a long way toward strengthening mental health.</p> <p>We’re examining what we’re truly going to need for our employees going forward. It's going to be a little bit of evolution depending on which way things trend and once we're back to a greater capacity in the work environment. We'll learn even better ways to care of our employees, who are facing complicated issues with childcare and elderly care and other issues that arise with the return to work.</p> <p><strong>You've made it through a lot of hurdles to get back to business. What else have you learned that you think would help other HR leaders?</strong></p> <p>Overall, I think you have to maintain flexibility and stay vigilant. We’ve got a great plan, which we continue to tweak and improve along the way, but there is still the fear of the unknown. That's why you can never let your guard down. You’ve got to constantly be ready for change. That's just the environment we're in right now until further notice. It’s about having that good infrastructure and that information pipeline so that when you need to react, you're ready to hit the ground running again.</p> <p>I also think it’s important to build a strong team so that each member can take a break when they need to. It is important to focus on your mental wellbeing, especially if you’re making decisions for a lot of people. You have to take care of yourself to take care of others. I hate to say it out loud, but for the first time in weeks, I feel like we have a little bit of room to breathe.</p> <div> <div> <div id="_com_1" language="JavaScript"> <p> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Tue, 30 Jun 2020 11:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 112 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com Nashville Public Health Order Mandating Masks Goes Into Effect https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/nashville-public-health-order-mandating-masks-goes-effect <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Nashville Public Health Order Mandating Masks Goes Into Effect</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/29/2020 - 10:06</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/111" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to Nashville Public Health Order Mandating Masks Goes Into Effect"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The Metro Public Health Department order mandating masks or face coverings is in effect as of Monday, June 29. The mandate comes as Nashville and Tennessee have seen a recent increase in COVID-19 cases. Vanderbilt Health Employer Solutions supports the use of masks to help reduce the spread of the virus, and we encourage all businesses to follow the Metro Public Health Department guidelines.</p> <p>“Wearing a mask, diligent hand hygiene and physical distancing are still our best tools to battle the spread of the virus,” said Jeff Balser, MD, PhD, President and CEO of Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Dean of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. “The early and decisive action by the Board of Health and Mayor Cooper to issue this mandate will help prevent our local hospitals from experiencing the high caseloads we are seeing in the South in areas of Alabama, Florida, and Texas, help us keep our economy open, and save lives.”</p> <p>What does the order mean for your business? The order requires masks/face coverings be worn when in indoor and outdoor public spaces.</p> <p> Masks are not required in the following settings and circumstances:</p> <ul> <li>By any child aged 12 years or younger. Any child younger than two years old must not wear a face covering because of risk of suffocation. </li> <li>In outdoor public spaces unless maintaining a physical distance of six feet from persons who are not members of the same household or residence is not feasible;</li> <li>While engaged in outdoor work or recreation, such as swimming, walking, hiking, bicycling, or running, unless maintaining a physical distance of six feet from persons who are not members of the same household or residence is not feasible;</li> <li>By those who cannot medically tolerate wearing a face covering. No person declining to wear a face covering because of a medical condition shall be required to produce verifying medical documentation;</li> <li>By those working alone in separate office spaces or in non-public workplaces that have more than adequate area for social distancing based on the size of and number of people in the space (either indoors or outdoors). Such persons must be prepared to wear a face covering when interacting with others in groups of 6 or more persons or in groups of any size where social distancing of more than six (6) feet cannot be consistently maintained;</li> <li>When wearing a face covering poses a safety risk or security risk. "Safety risk" includes, but is not limited to, where wearing a face covering may pose a risk to persons working on ladders or at height, wearing other respiratory protection, engaging in heavy physical exertion, operating heavy equipment, or operating in an environment where a face covering hinders communications. “Security risk” includes, but is not limited to, an activity or transaction where establishing the identity of the customer or employee is important. However, employers are encouraged to structure work to promote social distancing and limit close contact as much as possible within workplaces where Face Coverings may pose such risks; and</li> <li>When eating or drinking in public at a restaurant, bar, or other food or beverage establishment.</li> </ul> <p>The full public health order may be accessed <a href="https://www.asafenashville.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Order-8-FACE-MASKS-FINAL-SIGNED-V4-Amended-Children-section.pdf">here</a>. Thank you for playing your part to keep Nashville safe!</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/iStock-1202707966.jpg?itok=hOnj_34V" width="576" height="384" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Mon, 29 Jun 2020 15:06:47 +0000 roberjm7 111 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com American Airlines Boosts Travelers’ Peace of Mind With VUMC Expertise https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com/employer-insights-blog/american-airlines-boosts-travelers-peace-mind-vumc-expertise <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">American Airlines Boosts Travelers’ Peace of Mind With VUMC Expertise</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/users/roberjm7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">roberjm7</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 06/26/2020 - 09:00</span> <a href="/blog-post-rss/110" class="feed-icon" title="Subscribe to American Airlines Boosts Travelers’ Peace of Mind With VUMC Expertise"> RSS: <i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i> </a> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Taking new actions that focus on the well-being and safety of customers and team members, American Airlines <a href="http://news.aa.com/news/news-details/2020/American-Airlines-Expands-Its-Clean-Commitment-by-Adding-Vanderbilt-University-Medical-Center-on-New-Travel-Health-Advisory-Panel-OPS-DIS-06/default.aspx">today announced</a> that it has created a new Travel Health Advisory Panel that includes Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) infectious disease experts to advise on health and cleaning matters as travelers return over the summer.</p> <p>The panel will include VUMC experts Dr. David Aronoff, Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases, and Dr. Thomas Talbot, Chief Hospital Epidemiologist, national leaders in the field of infectious disease prevention. These experts will provide American with the latest information from public health authorities and scientific research as well as advice and guidance on disease prevention, cleaning procedures and other public health matters. The panel, which will include other safety and operations experts, will help American continue to improve and innovate its cleaning procedures and ensure customers always feel safe in the skies.</p> <p>“We’re pleased to have access to new guidance on infectious diseases from the experts at Vanderbilt University Medical Center,” said Alison Taylor, American’s Chief Customer Officer. “Drs. Aronoff and Talbot will be an important part of our decision-making process on issues including cleaning, health screening, and infection prevention and control.”</p> <p>“We are proud to be advising a worldwide aviation leader like American Airlines as it works diligently to bring a new level of health and safety to the skies,” said Jeff Balser, M.D., Ph.D., President and CEO of Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “As part of the Travel Health Advisory Panel, our infectious disease experts are working closely with leaders at American to help them identify and apply COVID-19 safety and infection prevention best practices for their team members and passengers around the world,”</p> <p>The new panel complements American’s existing work with medical director Dr. Stan Miller, and its ongoing consulting with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other outside experts.</p> <p><strong>Panel Develops COVID-19 Symptom Checklist for Travelers</strong></p> <p>In May, American began requiring all customers and team members on board to wear a face covering unless there is a medical reason why they cannot. And earlier this month American said it would limit flight privileges for customers who refuse to wear a face covering without a medical reason. Face masks are also required for customers throughout their journey at most of American’s hub airports, and American continues to encourage airports to make this the standard. Wearing a face covering continues to be one of the most important ways travelers can protect themselves and others while flying.</p> <p>In addition, beginning June 30, American will begin asking customers during the check-in process to certify that they have been free of COVID-19 symptoms for the past 14 days. American worked with Vanderbilt University Medical Center to develop the COVID-19 symptom checklist for each customer using self-service machines in airports or during online check-in at home. American has also been actively engaged with recent efforts by the industry trade group Airlines for America to put customer well-being first.</p> <p>“Our customers trust us to make every aspect of their journey safe. We won’t let them down,” Taylor said. “We will continue to refine and update our practices based on the latest information from health authorities and our own Travel Health Advisory Panel.”</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-barista-posts-full-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/barista_posts_full_image/public/1200x630_LinkedIn_Lounge_no_bkgd_logo.jpg?itok=D8Lv9oSM" width="576" height="302" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-barista-posts-full-image" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-lockdown-auth field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Lockdown Auth</div> <div class="field__item">1</div> </div> Fri, 26 Jun 2020 14:00:00 +0000 roberjm7 110 at https://employersolutions.vanderbilthealth.com